Part of a series of experiments using a digital enlarger powered by an iPhone I have built. The image is created by mounting an iPhone on top of a 35mm enlarger equipped with a 50mm lens, it can be enlarged and focused as with a 35mm negative. When using a grain focuser, instead of grain, the individual red green and blue pixels of the screen can be seen in detail. I've kept digital manipulation to a minimum on the phone, only flipping the image and then enabling the 'Invert Colours' option in the accessibility settings to provide what is essentially a 'Digital Negative' Dramatic vignetting can be seen in the prints, this is mainly because of limitations of the rig and perhaps a slight darkness of the iPhone screen in the corners. Results vary depending on the size and contrast of the image I've had the best results with prints that are similar in size to the iPhone screen, much larger and the grid pattern of the pixels starts to show. However, reproducing at 1:1, as with the retina display, the pixels are indiscernible to the human eye. These prints where made using Ilford Multigrade paper, exposed for between 4 - 10 seconds (depending on size) and wet processed using a mixture of Ilford/Kodak chemistry.
Part of a series of experiments using a digital enlarger powered by an iPhone I have built. The image is created by mounting an iPhone on top of a 35mm enlarger equipped with a 50mm lens, it can be enlarged and focused as with a 35mm negative. When using a grain focuser, instead of grain, the individual red green and blue pixels of the screen can be seen in detail. I've kept digital manipulation to a minimum on the phone, only flipping the image and then enabling the 'Invert Colours' option in the accessibility settings to provide what is essentially a 'Digital Negative' Dramatic vignetting can be seen in the prints, this is mainly because of limitations of the rig and perhaps a slight darkness of the iPhone screen in the corners. Results vary depending on the size and contrast of the image I've had the best results with prints that are similar in size to the iPhone screen, much larger and the grid pattern of the pixels starts to show. However, reproducing at 1:1, as with the retina display, the pixels are indiscernible to the human eye. These prints where made using Ilford Multigrade paper, exposed for between 4 - 10 seconds (depending on size) and wet processed using a mixture of Ilford/Kodak chemistry.
Part of a series of experiments using a digital enlarger powered by an iPhone I have built. The image is created by mounting an iPhone on top of a 35mm enlarger equipped with a 50mm lens, it can be enlarged and focused as with a 35mm negative. When using a grain focuser, instead of grain, the individual red green and blue pixels of the screen can be seen in detail. I've kept digital manipulation to a minimum on the phone, only flipping the image and then enabling the 'Invert Colours' option in the accessibility settings to provide what is essentially a 'Digital Negative' Dramatic vignetting can be seen in the prints, this is mainly because of limitations of the rig and perhaps a slight darkness of the iPhone screen in the corners. Results vary depending on the size and contrast of the image I've had the best results with prints that are similar in size to the iPhone screen, much larger and the grid pattern of the pixels starts to show. However, reproducing at 1:1, as with the retina display, the pixels are indiscernible to the human eye. These prints where made using Ilford Multigrade paper, exposed for between 4 - 10 seconds (depending on size) and wet processed using a mixture of Ilford/Kodak chemistry.
Part of a series of experiments using a digital enlarger powered by an iPhone I have built. The image is created by mounting an iPhone on top of a 35mm enlarger equipped with a 50mm lens, it can be enlarged and focused as with a 35mm negative. When using a grain focuser, instead of grain, the individual red green and blue pixels of the screen can be seen in detail. I've kept digital manipulation to a minimum on the phone, only flipping the image and then enabling the 'Invert Colours' option in the accessibility settings to provide what is essentially a 'Digital Negative' Dramatic vignetting can be seen in the prints, this is mainly because of limitations of the rig and perhaps a slight darkness of the iPhone screen in the corners. Results vary depending on the size and contrast of the image I've had the best results with prints that are similar in size to the iPhone screen, much larger and the grid pattern of the pixels starts to show. However, reproducing at 1:1, as with the retina display, the pixels are indiscernible to the human eye. These prints where made using Ilford Multigrade paper, exposed for between 4 - 10 seconds (depending on size) and wet processed using a mixture of Ilford/Kodak chemistry.
Part of a series of experiments using a digital enlarger powered by an iPhone I have built. The image is created by mounting an iPhone on top of a 35mm enlarger equipped with a 50mm lens, it can be enlarged and focused as with a 35mm negative. When using a grain focuser, instead of grain, the individual red green and blue pixels of the screen can be seen in detail. I've kept digital manipulation to a minimum on the phone, only flipping the image and then enabling the 'Invert Colours' option in the accessibility settings to provide what is essentially a 'Digital Negative' Dramatic vignetting can be seen in the prints, this is mainly because of limitations of the rig and perhaps a slight darkness of the iPhone screen in the corners. Results vary depending on the size and contrast of the image I've had the best results with prints that are similar in size to the iPhone screen, much larger and the grid pattern of the pixels starts to show. However, reproducing at 1:1, as with the retina display, the pixels are indiscernible to the human eye. These prints where made using Ilford Multigrade paper, exposed for between 4 - 10 seconds (depending on size) and wet processed using a mixture of Ilford/Kodak chemistry.